The Eagle Biosciences NT-proCNP ELISA Assay Kit (manufactured by Biomedica) was used in a recent study published out of the University of Otago in Christchurch, New Zealand. This kit is used for the quantitative determination of NT-proCNP in human serum and plasma (EDTA, citrate, heparin). CNP, C-type natriuretic peptide, along with other natriuretic peptides, plays a role in regulatory mechanisms including blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis. It also serves as a biomarker.

Plasma C-Type Natriuretic Peptide: Emerging Applications in Disorders of Skeletal Growth

Abstract


Although studies in experimental animals show that blood levels of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its bioinactive aminoterminal propeptide (NTproCNP) are potential biomarkers of long bone growth, a lack of suitable assays and appropriate reference ranges has limited the application of CNP measurements in clinical practice. Plasma concentrations of the processed product of proCNP, NTproCNP – and to a lesser extent CNP itself – correlate with concurrent height velocity throughout all phases of normal skeletal growth, as well as during interventions known to affect skeletal growth in children. Since a change in levels precedes a measurable change in height velocity during interventions, measuring NTproCNP may have predictive value in clinical practice. Findings from a variety of genetic disorders affecting CNP signaling suggest that plasma concentrations of both peptides may be helpful in diagnosis, provided factors such as concurrent height velocity, feedback regulation of CNP, and differential changes in peptide clearance are considered when interpreting values. An improved understanding of factors affecting plasma levels, and the availability of commercial kits enabling accurate measurement using small volumes of plasma, can be expected to facilitate potential applications in growth disorders including genetic causes affecting the CNP signaling pathway.

Espiner, E.; Prickett, T.; Olney, Robert; (2019). Plasma C-Type Natriuretic Peptide: Emerging Applications in Disorders of Skeletal Growth. Horm. Res. Paediatr., 90:345–357. DOI: 10.1159/000496544

Contact us for more information about this kit or our other natriuretic peptide assay kits.

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Eagle Biosciences Introduces Endothelin 1-21 and Big Endothelin-1 ELISA Kit



Related Resources Citing EagleBio Kits:

Stanek, B. et al. “Prognostic evaluation of neurohumoral plasma levels before and during beta-blocker therapy in advanced left ventricular dysfunction” Journal of American Cardiology 2001; 38: 436-442.


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EagleBio Spotlight: Natriuretic Peptides



What
are Natriuretic peptides?

The natriuretic peptides belong to a family of
structurally similar but genetically different peptide hormones and include atrial, brain, and C type (ANP, BNP, and CNP, respectively). A-type and B-type have primarily have functions in the cardiovascular system and make up the cardiac natriuretic peptides. 
The discovery of this family was a major breakthrough in modern medicine and more specifically, cardiovascular physiology. This finding provided a direct connection between the heart and the kidneys with respect to the regulation of natriuresis.

These natriuretic peptides are modulated through their cognate receptors which are known as the ANP-A (a.k.a. NPR-A, GC-A), ANP-B (a.k.a. NPR-B, GC-B) and ANP-C (a.k.a NPR-C) receptors. ANP and BNP
preferentially bind to a membrane bound guanylyl cyclase (GC) receptor called
GC-A or NPR1, whereas CNP is the physiological ligand for GC-B (NPR2).

All natriuretic peptides are produced as propeptides,
which are then cleaved into the biologically active, C-terminal hormone
and the N-terminal fragment (NT-proANP 1-98, NT-proBNP 1-76 and NT-proCNP). It has been discovered that N-terminal fragments are
much more stable, and circulate in higher amounts than the active hormones. Thus, for these reasons the N-terminal fragments are easier and more reliable for measurement in serum or plasma.

The natriuretic peptides play an important role in the
regulation of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis and in the regulation of
fatty acid metabolism and body weight. In addition, in recent
studies natriuretic peptides have been proven to be valuable biomarkers for cardiac
pathology, including myocardial ischaemia and left ventricular dysfunction, as
well as risk stratification in congestive heart failure (CVD). 

Natriuretic peptides have a wide range of roles and
effects on several biological functions within the body as seen below.


Biological Functions of Natriuretic
peptides:

  • Natriuresis
  • Vasodilation
  • Homeostasis
  • Inhibition of
    aldosterone system
  • Inhibition of
    renin-angiotensin system
  • Inhibition of
    vascular smooth muscle growth (i.e. myocardial, endothelial, smooth
    muscle)
  • Inhibition of
    ADH hormone
  • Inhibition of
    aldosterone hormone

References

  1. Clerico A et al. “Thirty years of the heart as an endocrine organ: physiological role and clinical utility of cardiac natriuretic hormones.” Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2011; 301: H12-H20.
  2. Doust, Jenny et al. “The Role of BNP Testing in Heart Failure.” American Family Phyisician; 2006 Dec 1;74(11):1893-190.
  3. Lauridsen, Bo K et al. “ProANP Plasma Measurement Predicts All-Cause Mortality in Acutely Hospitalized Patients: A Cohort Study.” BMJ Open 2013;3:e003288 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003288
  4. Moro, Cedric et al. “Natriuretic Peptides: New Players in Energy Homeostasis.” Diabetes 2009; 12: 2726-2728
  5. Nazario, B et al. “Atrial and Brain Natriuretic Peptides Stimulate the Production and Secretion of C-type Natriuretic Peptide from Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells.” Journal of Clinical Investigation 1995 Mar; 95(3): 1151–1157.
  6. Schreibe, Donald et al. “Natriuretic Peptides in Congestive Heart Failure.” Medscape 2012: Jan 10.
  7. Suzuki, T et al. “The Role of the Natriuretic Peptides in the Cardiovascular System.” Cardiovascular Research 2001; 51: 489–494.
  8. Stanek, B. et al. “Prognostic evaluation of neurohumoral plasma levels before and during beta-blocker therapy in advanced left ventricular dysfunction” Journal of American Cardiology 2001; 38: 436-442

Related Resources Citing EagleBio Kits:

  1. Stanek, B. et al. “Prognostic evaluation of neurohumoral plasma levels before and during beta-blocker therapy in advanced left ventricular dysfunction” Journal of American Cardiology 2001; 38: 436-442.

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proANP ELISA Assay Kit

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        What
        is CNP?

        CNP stands for C-type natriuretic peptide and it is
        derived from a preprohormone of 126 amino acids and a prohormone of 53 amino
        acids. CNP was originally found in the
        central nervous system in much greater concentrations than ANP or BNP. CNP
        is produced by cardiac tissue, but is expressed primarily in the brain,
        pituitary gland, vascular endothelium, kidney and female reproductive tract. It
        has been discovered that it is produced in the vascular endothelial cells and after
        secretion of CNP from these endothelial cells, it is regulated by cytokines and
        growth factors.

        Unlike ANP and BNP, CNP has a very insignificant role
        in natriuretic and diuretic processes. The
        physiological role of CNP is not only studied in cardiac disease, but also in
        bone developmental biology, bone research, renal diseases, embryonic
        developmental research, and vascular diseases. In past studies, it has been
        found to play an important paracrine regulatory role in the
        vasculature and involvement in neural control.


        Biochemical Structure of CNP:

        CNP produces 22 and 53 amino acid fragments.
        Unlike ANP and BNP, CNP terminates in the second cysteine residue, lacking a
        further C-terminal extension.


        What is NTproCNP?

        NT-proCNP is the amino-terminal peptide derived from the cleavage of the prohormone proCNP. It is an equimolar product of CNP biosynthesis and is easily measured in plasma. NTproCNP is not subject to clearance pathways and it is found in the circulation at 20- to 50-fold higher concentrations than the biologically active forms of CNP. 


        Why Measure NTproCNP?

        NTproCNP is considered to be a reliable and stable marker for measuring
        CNP biosysthesis. Studies have revealed
        that there is a high serum CNP concentration in critically ill subjects or individuals
        who have undergone trauma. NT-proCNP has
        been correlated to biomarkers of organ dysfunction and has been associated with
        inflammatory and metabolic pathways.
        Therefore, it has been recently been proposed as a novel biomarker for
        predicting sepsis in traumatized patients.


         Indications for CNP:

        • Vascular Disease
        • Diabetes
        • Skeletal Development
        • Sepsis
        • Renal Disease


        References:

        1. Clerico A et al. “Thirty years of the heart as an endocrine organ: physiological role and clinical utility of cardiac natriuretic hormones.” Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2011; 301: H12-H20.
        2. Hoffman et al. “Prognostic Value of Plasma N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Severe Sepsis.” Circulation; 2005:112:527-534.
        3. Koch, A. et al. “Prognostic value of circulating amino-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide in critically ill patients.” Critical Care 2011, 15:R45 doi:10.1186/cc10007.
        4. Moro, Cedric et al. “Natriuretic Peptides: New Players in Energy Homeostasis.” Diabetes 2009; 12: 2726-2728
        5. Nazario, B et al. “Atrial and Brain Natriuretic Peptides Stimulate the Production and Secretion of C-type Natriuretic Peptide from Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells.” Journal of Clinical Investigation 1995 Mar; 95(3): 1151–1157. 
        6. Olney, Robert et al. “Amino-terminal propeptide of C-type natriuretic peptide (NTproCNP) predicts height velocity in healthy children.” Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2012 Sep; 77(3): 416–422.
        7. Schreibe, Donald et al. “Natriuretic Peptides in Congestive Heart Failure.” Medscape 2012: Jan 10.
        8. Suzuki, T et al. “The Role of the Natriuretic Peptides in the Cardiovascular System.” Cardiovascular Research 2001; 51: 489–494.


        Related Resources Citing EagleBio Kits:

        1. Stanek, B. et al. “Prognostic evaluation of neurohumoral plasma levels before and during beta-blocker therapy in advanced left ventricular dysfunction” Journal of American Cardiology 2001; 38: 436-442.

        Related Kits:

        NT-proCNP ELISA Assay Kit

        proANP ELISA Assay Kit

        BNP Fragment (Nt-proBNP 8-29) ELISA Assay Kit

        Cardiovascular Assay Kits


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        EagleBio Spotlight: Natriuretic Peptides

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